forum sub header
alumni-sub-header
   



Bauman College Programs

Author Topic: Nutrition and unpacking class privilege  (Read 265 times)

Offline karineponce

  • Student
  • ***
  • Posts: 1
Nutrition and unpacking class privilege
« on: March 06, 2018, 08:58:40 PM »
My passion for health and environmental justice has grown over the past year, and I’ve struggled to talk about healthy foods and their potencial to do good because “health and wellness” has been soaked in aristocracy and class elitism. I refuse to go in that direction, the health industry shouldnt be exclusive in who can afford health. That needs to change but will only change if consumers bring it back down with humility and simplicity. Demand fresh food/water to be accessible to everyone, go to local farmers markets- help local farmers not large corporations, I hope to see them in all neighborhoods one day-not just wealthier ones. I would like to see water filters made more affordable, i.e. using inexpensive activated charcoal in water. Fresh food accessibility and knowledge needs to circumvent income and class. No more unilateral approaches that only benefits those who can afford it, “environmental justice advocates for urban gardens, clean water, considers those whose lives are made worse by environmental degradation and pollution and finds solutions to help both the people and their local ecosystems.”

Link: https://ecowarriorprincess.net/2018/02/unpacking-racial-class-privilege-within-eco-lifestyle-movement/
« Last Edit: March 06, 2018, 09:00:55 PM by karineponce »

Offline Lila.Volkas

  • Global Moderator
  • ***
  • Posts: 81
Re: Nutrition and unpacking class privilege
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2018, 12:49:23 PM »
Thanks so much for sharing this article!

Offline gwenythshears

  • Student
  • ***
  • Posts: 1
Re: Nutrition and unpacking class privilege
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2018, 10:28:53 PM »
Thank you for this post. I think about food accessibility and environmental justice i underserved communities, but I have never thought about the sustainable movement as elitist... Until now. It totally makes sense. People in low-income communities have very limited access to fresh healthy food, live in some of the most polluted areas of the city or country, and are ignored by policy and lawmakers. Affordability is an issue with everything from food to healthcare. The elite, take it all for granted, turn a blind eye to the "have nots", and walk around town with their $36 bottles of water thinking that they are making a difference. Everyone has a right to fresh food; everyone has a right to clean air, soil, and water; and everyone has a right to participate in sustainability.

The earth won't survive if this is a movement for the 1%; it won't mean anything if we don't all participate. As the article states, "A healthy lifestyle shouldn’t be something one can buy into in the ideal culture. True advocates for health and longevity should wish them for everyone, not just a small selection of people who already have access to the best healthcare."  There are good people doing good work in underserved communities, but with limited resources, that work can only go so far. What will it take to open the eyes of those who are blinded by the capitalist version of health, wellness, and sustainability?

Offline susanagyeman

  • Student
  • ***
  • Posts: 1
Re: Nutrition and unpacking class privilege
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2018, 06:24:32 PM »
Thanks for sharing this. I notice this often in my everyday life. The grocery stores int he suburbs of my city have two full organic aisles and a gluten free section.  There is a large organic and local section both making it much easier to shop for eating for health. There is one grocery store in the part of my city that is most economically disadvantaged. Inside of that store the regular produce is often molded or on clearance because it has been sitting for so long. There is NO organic/health food aisle and it's very difficult to make healthy choices.  it's very upsetting to me. I understand that they stock "what people in the area buy" but it doesn't give people a chance! People who are living in the city have to travel further to grocery stores outside of the city but a lot of people cannot afford to do this. There are these lovely, trendy little restaurants just downtown that offer sustainable meals and vegan/vegetarian options. But they are pricey.
Luckily there are non profits and community gardens that are making efforts to hand out free fresh fruits and vegetables to people in need (and people in general). They are starting to offer education on proper nutrition to the children in the area but it's a huge problem with many facets. Thanks so much for bringing this to the table. It's a much needed discussion.

 


SPEAK WITH AN ADVISOR